On appearances

Pretend inferiority and encourage his arrogance   -Sun Tzu

 

This quote can mean so much it’s hard to really extrapolate the wisdom on first encounter.

First, consider the battle of Cannae where Hannibal handed am embarrassing defeat to the Romans. By drawing the Romans too deep into the enemy lines he leveraged their rush to victory by causing them to overextend themselves. In moments it became apparent that what seemed like victory was actually defeat. But the Roman commanders in the rear, eager for victory, pushed 100% of their energy into a seemingly broken enemy. We see this tactic used in many philosophies and even martial artist’s who study how to leverage an enemies momentum to throw them off balance.

 

Also consider how many times you encounter someone who brings you negativity and openly or subtly attacks you as a person. It’s natural to respond to any of these attacks but you have to wonder sometimes if it’s really worth it? Would you stop walking down the street to exchange insults with a stray dog? Probably not, because now you are investing valuable resources into something completely fruitless. Another saying which goes “walk softly but carry a big stick” is similar in the sense that it means to let things move right past you. If you need to strike, then strike hard but don’t waste time matching wits among people who can be easily overstepped with minimal effort.

It can hurt your pride but ultimately your rational thought process will give you an upper hand while you opponents, drunk with the chance possibility of victory, will stumble headfirst into their own undoing.

 

Knowledge = Dividends

beach An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest.     – Benjamin Franklin

 

Benjamin Franklin was a very smart man. If you haven’t read his autobiography I suggest you do so.

There’s a few things you could take away from this quote…

In today’s economy their is a dream or belief in getting rich while doing nothing is the apex of success (and hubris). We live in a society where we actually believe in something for nothing. But as the economy evolves faster and faster we will need to realize more and more that we are sending our hopes and dreams to wall street and Washington D.C. We might as well be sending them to Las Vegas because the odds are basically the same. When the economy changes we no longer adapt as a nation. Instead we refuse to learn, change and grow. Now our economy is so rigid and frail nothing short of 85 billion a month will maintain our addiction to ignorance. We need to value real knowledge instead of chasing the knowledge of “how to earn a living without really doing anything of substance”